Rethinking Schools Fall 2012 Magazine: Race and Place

The fall issue of our magazine is now available on our website. The theme is Race and Place—teachers explore the context for today’s foreclosure and homelessness crises, and answer the question: Why don’t black and brown people in the United States have more inherited wealth?

In “Burned Out of Homes and History: Unearthing the Silenced Voices of the Tulsa Race Riot” master teacher Linda Christensen helps high school students begin to answer this question—and write historical fiction along the way—with an exploration of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot.

Then Katharine Johnson brings the Civil Rights Movement home to elementary school students with a role play about redlining in their own city: “‘Why Is This the Only Place in Portland I See Black People?’ Teaching Young Children About Redlining.”

In “Boot Camp for CEOs,” education writer Alain Jehlen investigates the Broad Superintendents Academy, which filled 48 percent of all large district superintendent openings last year—including Chicago’s Jean-Claude Brizard.

PLUS an exclusive interview with esteemed educator/scholar/activist Lisa Delpitauthor of “Multiplication is for White People”: Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children. 

And much, much more.

Check our fall issue, subscribe, and return here to let us know what you think!

 

One thought on “Rethinking Schools Fall 2012 Magazine: Race and Place

  1. As a country founded and developed through slaughter and enslavement (which surely continues today), it’s hard to see how we can progress as a society without facing issues of race and class. It appears that the balance of numbers is shifting so dramatically now that we may be able to have that discussion – together, in the open, without the necessity of the raised fist because we will be the ones with the power. The real question then will be if we can assume that power without doing to “them” what was done to “us”. I like to think it’s possible because an oppressed person has had the opportunity to become far more mature through the process.

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