“Rethinking Ethnic Studies” Is a Finalist for the 2019 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards

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Edited by  R. Tolteka Cuauhtin, Miguel Zavala, Christine Sleeter, Wayne Au

We’re pleased to share Rethinking Ethnic Studies has been recognized as a finalist in the 22nd annual Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards.

 

Foreword Magazine, Inc. hosts an annual awards program each year. Finalists represent the best books published in 2019. After more than 2,000 individual titles spread across 55 genres were submitted for consideration, the list of finalists was determined by Foreword’s editorial team.

 

The complete list of finalists can be found here.

As part of a growing nationwide movement to bring Ethnic Studies into K–12 classrooms, Rethinking Ethnic Studies brings together many of the leading teachers, activists, and scholars in this movement to offer examples of Ethnic Studies frameworks, classroom practices, and organizing at the school, district, and statewide levels. Built around core themes of indigeneity, colonization, anti-racism, and activism, Rethinking Ethnic Studies offers vital resources for educators committed to the ongoing struggle for racial justice in our schools.

 

Read the introduction

Read the excerpt, “Reimagining and Rewriting Our Lives Through Ethnic Studies” by Dueñas, López and López.

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Edited by  R. Tolteka Cuauhtin, Miguel Zavala, Christine Sleeter, Wayne Au

 

Get 25% off Rethinking Ethnic Studies
when you use the code FOREWORD25 at checkout.

Click here to order.

Expires April 30, 2020

 

 

The New Teacher Book is a Finalist for the 2019 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards

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Edited by Linda Christensen, Stan Karp,
Bob Peterson, and Moé Yonamine

 

We’re pleased to share The New Teacher Book: Finding purpose, balance, and hope during your first years in the classroom has been recognized as a finalist in the 22nd annual Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards.

Foreword Magazine, Inc. hosts an annual awards program. Finalists represent the best books published in 2019. More than 2,000 titles, spread across 55 genres, competed for recognition, and the finalists were determined by Foreword’s editorial team.

The complete list of finalists can be found here.

From the book’s introduction:

When the editors of Rethinking Schools first conceived of The New Teacher Book, we thought back to our days as new teachers. We hoped to create the book we needed in those sometimes exhilarating, sometimes lonely, often hard first days of our teaching careers.

This book is meant as a conversation among colleagues. We hope it is a conversation that helps you keep your vision and values intact as you work in institutions that may or may not be the citadels of idealism where you imaged yourself teaching.

Our opening chapter explores how to “start strong” by building community so that students feel safe to take intellectual risks and ask tough questions, develop empathy by listening to their classmates’ stories, gain knowledge by engaging with a curriculum that puts their lives at the center, and embrace their own and others’ cultures, histories and languages.

Read an excerpt from the book, “Creating Community Out of Chaos” by Linda Christensen.

 

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Get 25% off The New Teacher Book
when you use the code FOREWORD25 at checkout.

Expires April 30, 2020

CLICK HERE TO ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY!

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Our Appreciation

Dear Rethinking Schools friends,

More than 30 years ago, Rethinking Schools began as an activist publication by a group of Milwaukee teachers passionate about combatting scripted curriculum, standardized testing, and textbook-dominated curriculum while emphasizing multicultural education and a commitment to racial justice.

The original 1986 Rethinking Schools newsprint tabloid began with 35 subscription requests. Volunteers helped count and bundle the newsprint with twine and deliver the publication across the city. Within the first two and a half years, the print run grew to an impressive 20,000 that were distributed free of charge to Milwaukee schools, libraries, and community centers.

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Since our founding, we’ve grown into a nationally prominent book publisher, growing our relationship with educators of conscience around the country.  

This Teacher Appreciation Day, we would like to say 
thank you to the countless educators and education activists who have contributed to our mission over the years. Whether you submitted an article, shared our resources with a new teacher, subscribed to our magazine, purchased a book, volunteered, or donated, your support has helped us support teachers as they teach and organize for racial and social justice. 

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Our success building a national and global presence with no institutional or corporate backing is made possible by a community of educators and activists dedicated to building the schools our children deserve. You are a member of that community. 

From all of us at Rethinking Schools, thank you! 


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Click here to browse our books and magazine subscriptions

Take Sides for the Earth and Teach Climate Justice

A People's Curriculum for the Earth

A People’s Curriculum for the Earth by Bill Bigelow and Tim Swinehart.

TEACHING CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS

As we celebrate Earth Day, we invite you to join us in taking sides for the Earth by teaching climate justice and becoming part of the #TeachClimateJustice movement with our book,  A People’s Curriculum for the Earth by Bill Bigelow and Tim Swinehart.

The book is an infinitely useful collection of articles, role plays, simulations, stories, poems, and graphics that help breathe life into teaching about the environmental crisis. A People’s Curriculum for the Earth features classroom-friendly readings on climate change, energy, water, food, and pollution—as well as on people who are working to make things better.

For Earth Month, get 15% off your order when you use code EARTH19 at checkout through 5/1/19.

Order your copy today. 


Additional Resources to Teach Climate Justice

Varshini Prakash of the Sunrise movement.

OUR HOUSE IS ON FIRE — TIME TO TEACH CLIMATE JUSTICE
By Bill Bigelow

For too long, the fossil fuel industry has tried to buy teachers’ and students’ silence by saddling us with a curriculum of climate denialism, and spreading climate change doubt that made its way into mainstream textbooks. The gulf between the severity of the climate crisis and the curricular response in schools continues to yawn wide. This is where we come in. Social justice educators need to expose the biased and damaging curriculum and construct an alternative.

Continue Reading. 

 


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ZINN EDUCATION PROJECT’S TEACH CLIMATE JUSTICE CAMPAIGN

This month, the Zinn Education Project is launching the Teach Climate Justice campaign.

How do we teach the climate crisis in a way that also confronts racism, economic inequality, misogyny, militarism, xenophobia, and that imagines the kind of world that we would like to live in?

The Zinn Education Project has compiled classroom-tested lessons, recommended books and films, a sample school board climate justice resolution, and is offering workshops for educators.

Visit the Climate Justice Resources

 


‘WE CAN BE WHATEVER WE HAVE THE COURAGE TO SEE’: A New Video from AOC Envisions a #GreenNewDeal
From Common Dreams staff writer, Eoin Higgins

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Common Dreams shares a colorful new video from Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez released by The Intercept that can help us imagine what the Green New Deal will mean for our communities, schools, and classrooms.

 

The video features art from Molly Crabapple, the artist who illustrated our #SchoolsToo magazine issue cover.

Learn more and watch the inspiring video here.

 

Linda Christensen on the Second Edition of Reading, Writing, and Rising Up, What Role the Classroom Played in Revision, and What Needs to Change in How We Teach

Rethinking Schools published Linda Christensen’s Reading, Writing, and Rising Up in 2000. The original book, Linda says, was based on her first 20 years in the classroom at Jefferson High School in Portland, Oregon. Since then, Linda’s work has been recognized as an essential resource for integrating social justice into language arts classrooms. She followed the first edition of Reading, Writing, and Rising Up with Teaching for Joy and Justice: Re-imagining the Language Arts Classroom and Rhythm and Resistance: Teaching Poetry for Social Justice, which built on her work of engaging students with writing by integrating their lives into the classroom.

The second edition of Reading, Writing, and Rising Up captures her imperative of bringing students’ lives into the classroom not just to build literacy skills, but to help students uncover the roots of inequality and meet real and imagined people and movements who have worked for change.

It’s been almost 20 years since the original Reading, Writing, and Rising Up arrived. Linda has spent several years — in between her work as director of the Oregon Writing Project and working with teachers locally and throughout the country — rewriting, revising, and reteaching the lessons in Reading, Writing, and Rising Up.

The new volume is fully revised and features new sections, updated lesson plans, and exemplary student work. The book is a gift to a new generation of students and teachers. We sat down with Linda to talk about what readers can expect.

Rethinking Schools: What was the process of revising and putting together the second edition of Reading, Writing, and Rising Up?

Linda Christensen: I had a whole new body of material that I had been working on since the original Reading, Writing, and Rising Up came out, and a few people thought that some of the articles in Reading, Writing, and Rising Up (particularly the cartoon unit “Unlearning the Myths that Bind Us”) were dated.

That led me to think about whether I wanted to write a new book or if I wanted to update Reading, Writing, and Rising Up. I thought about it a lot, and there were so many teaching pieces in Reading, Writing, and Rising Up that I still used and that still resonated with other educators, so I decided to do a full revision of the book rather than creating a new book.

I talked to a number of teachers and professors who use the book and asked them what pieces they thought remained current and what pieces they thought needed to be revised. Then I went back through and looked at each of the articles. My production editor, Kjerstin Johnson, also examined the book for places that were dated. Then I retaught almost every lesson to see how they worked today, whether they were still relevant, and what needed to be changed.

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Educator Rosie Frascella from Brooklyn, New York, couldn’t wait to pick up the new edition of Reading, Writing, and Rising Up.

You said you retaught many of the pieces. What role did the classroom play in the second edition?

The classroom is my source of inspiration. Out of the classroom I can create curriculum, but I need to observe students, listen to their class talk, and read their pieces to determine whether the lessons land or fall with students. I needed to see how lessons resonated with students today versus students 20 years ago. I keep returning to the classroom because it’s where I find my joy. I can’t think about teaching in isolation, away from classrooms.

Continue reading

Rethinking Schools vs. Heartland Institute

Dear Rethinking Schools friends,

Did you see that the Koch brothers-supported Heartland Institute is sending a climate denial textbook to every science teacher in the country? As the Moms Clean Air Force writes, “Every science teacher across America will receive a ‘free’ copy of a book of climate lies.”

The climate crisis is threatening life on Earth, and the fossil fuel industry is so drunk with greed that they continue to poison the curriculum around climate change.

Teachers desperately need resources to teach the truth about climate change and to counter the Heartland Institute’s materials that are flooding into schools.

Donate now so that we can send a copy of A People’s Curriculum for the Earth to every teacher who requests one in the states most threatened by lies spread by the fossil fuel industry.

As Naomi Klein, author of This Changes Everything, says, “A People’s Curriculum for the Earth is an educator’s toolkit for our times.” Help us send it where it’s needed most.

~Bob Peterson, Rethinking Schools Board President

Help Rethinking Schools Abolish Columbus Day

Dear Rethinking Schools friends,

Christopher Columbus was the first European to send enslaved people from the Americas to Europe, as well as the first to promote the enslavement of Africans in the Americas. And yet we still honor him with a national holiday? Please donate now to help Rethinking Schools teach a new generation of students the truth about Columbus and the people who were here first.

Almost 25 years ago, Rethinking Schools published our first booklet, Rethinking Columbus. We believed there were teachers besides us who would be eager for an alternative to the rah-rah Columbus-discovered-America textbook fare. We had no idea just how eager teachers were: Rethinking Columbus sold a thousand copies a day, seven days a week, for the first three months the booklet was in print. And, thanks to Native American organizations, teacher unions, social justice education groups, and progressive teacher education programs, Rethinking Columbus has gone on to become a resource in classrooms throughout the country.

Recently, we’ve been gratified to see the explosion of activism with cities and school districts voting to abolish Columbus Day in favor of Indigenous Peoples Day: Albuquerque, N. M.; Seattle and Olympia, Wash.; St. Paul, Minn.; Anadarko, Okla.; Portland, Ore.;  . . . and the list continues to grow.

Rethinking Schools—in conjunction with the Zinn Education Project, which we coordinate with Teaching for Change—plans a major push this year to undermine Columbus Day and to build support for Indigenous Peoples Day. As Rethinking Schools editor Bill Bigelow wrote in “Time to Abolish Columbus Day,” his most recent Zinn Education Project column: “If Indigenous peoples’ lives mattered in our society, and if Black people’s lives mattered in our society, it would be inconceivable that we would honor the father of the slave trade with a national holiday.”

Who we celebrate helps determine the lives and experiences that are most valued in our society. By working to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day, we hope to eliminate the silence around the history and current reality of Indigenous People as a testament to the importance of Indigenous lives. Rethinking Schools relies on supporters like you to help us continue this important work. Please donate today to  help us continue to teach the truth and to help make our world more equal and more just.

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