Call for Science Submissions: Cycle 2

Rethinking Schools needs more articles that focus on science. We are looking for submissions that show what engaging students’ sense of equity and justice looks, sounds, and feels like through the teaching of science.  We seek justice-centered, equity-oriented, story-rich, and critical articles that describe science teaching and curriculum in PK-12 classrooms, community spaces, or PK-12 teacher preparation.

What we need and what to write

Science is more than worksheets, textbooks, and memorization. Science touches everyday lives of all people. We encourage stories from a diverse range of science fields such as natural, physical, earth, and life. We invite you to submit a story that shows science teaching that is sensitive to cultural, historical, environmental, and socioeconomic contexts. We want stories that show how learning science helps students better understand the forces that shape their world. We want educators of all types to share how they use science to enhance learning, promote critique, and address real-world social, cultural, political, and ecological problems—including the climate crisis. We are looking for articles that discuss:

  • teaching science in classrooms from a social justice/equity perspective
  • students and teachers working together to use science as a tool to promote social justice
  • science in everyday practices of various cultures, families, and communities
  • culturally relevant/culturally revitalizing/culturally sustaining science teaching

How to write

Students’ voices are important; make sure we can hear them! Rethinking Schools is purposefully not an academic journal. We want the writing to be lively, conversational, and to avoid needless jargon. Please approach your story as a narrative, filled with anecdotes and voices of students, teachers, parents/guardians, caregivers, family, and/or community members.

****PLEASE NOTE: Before you begin writing or submit your article, please:

  1. Check out the writers’ guidelines;
  2. Read through several issues of Rethinking Schools the magazine noticing how the authors show what they do and how they integrate information about the academic topic into the article; and
  3. Review specific models, such as:

For additional details, review our call for submissions, here.

When and where to send

Cycle II submissions will be accepted until December 2, 2016.

For submissions, go to: http://tiny.cc/RSscience

For inquiries, email: science@rethinkingschools.org 

We look forward to receiving your submission,

Amy Lindahl, Bejanae Kareem, Jana Dean, and Vera Stenhouse

RS Science Submissions Committee

Magazine Call for Science Submissions

You asked and we listened! Rethinking Schools needs more articles that focus on science. We are looking for submissions from you that show what engaging students’ sense of equity and justice looks, sounds, and feels like through the teaching of science.  We seek justice-centered, equity-oriented, story-rich, and critical articles that describe science teaching and curriculum in PK-12 classrooms, community spaces, or PK-12 teacher preparation.

What we need and what to write

Science is more than worksheets, textbooks, and memorization. Science touches everyday lives of all people. We encourage stories from a diverse range of science fields such as natural, physical, earth, and life.We invite you to submit a story that shows science teaching that is sensitive to cultural, historical, environmental, and socioeconomic contexts. We want stories that show how learning science helps students better understand the forces that shape their world. We want educators of all types to share how they use science to enhance learning, promote critique, and address real-world social, cultural, political, and ecological problems. We are especially looking for articles that discuss:

  • teaching science in classrooms from a social justice/equity perspective
  • students and teachers working together to use science as a tool to enact social justice
  • science in everyday practices of various cultures, families, and communities
  • culturally relevant/culturally revitalizing/culturally sustaining science teaching 

How to write

Students’ voices are important; make sure we can hear them! Rethinking Schools is purposefully not an academic journal. We want the writing to be lively, conversational, and to avoid needless jargon. Please approach your story as a narrative with a beginning, middle, and end, filled with anecdotes and the voices of students, teachers, parents or guardians, caregivers, family, and/or community members.

Before you begin writing, check out the writers’ guidelines. The best way to understand what works forRethinking Schools is to read through several issues ofthe magazine noticing how the authors show what they do and how they integrate information about the academic topic into the article. Specific models you might want to refer to include:

For additional details, review our call for submissions:

http://www.rethinkingschools.org/about/guidelines.shtml

When and where to send

Cycle 1 submissions due August 1, 2015. Submissions will be accepted on a rolling basis until August 1.

To submit your submission: http://tiny.cc/RSscience

For inquiries, email: science@rethinkingschools.org 

We look forward to receiving your submission!

RS Science Submissions Committee:

Amy Lindahl, Bejanae Kareem, Jana Dean, Jean Aguilar-Valdez, and Vera Stenhouse,

Who’s talking about the summer issue?

by Kris Collett

Our summer issue is out, and many articles are already garnering positive attention.

We’re stoked that our editorial “The New Misogyny” spread on Twitter like wildfire. Thanks to Diane Ravitch for retweeting it to her 30,000+ followers! Read it now to see what the buzz is about.

Our friends at AlterNet and at Common Dreams posted Bill Bigelow’s article “From Johannesburg to Tucson.” I always learn something new about the people’s history when I read Bill’s articles, but it’s his insightful observations that make me pause and reflect on the kind of society I want to leave behind:

“The common denominator in these instances is the disrespect of those in power for students’ capacity to think critically and to take action based on their beliefs. When educational authorities consistently display such slight regard for students’ academic and moral capacities, is it any wonder that they match this contempt with an intellectually thin, idea-poor curriculum?”

The Institute for Humane Education has a very fine blog, Humane Connection. They dedicated a post to a brief review of the issue focusing on two articles they believe embody the principles of humane education.

The National Writing Project shared Linda Christensen’s article with their 7,300 twitter followers. “The Danger of a Single Story” is about an essay writing unit Linda completed with her high school students shortly following the tragic murder of Trayvon Martin.

In addition to directing the Oregon Writing Project at Lewis & Clark College, which takes her into schools all around the Portland area, Linda also teaches a class at Jefferson High School (as a volunteer), where she taught for almost 25 years.

We also dedicated space in the magazine to teacher quality issues, including Stan Karp’s article “Taking Teacher Quality Seriously.”  The article was picked up by the Marshall Memo, a widely read “weekly round-up of important ideas and research in K-12 education.”

These are just a few highlights from the issue. Check out the entire issue, and consider a subscription if you like what you see.  (Use code 5PAYWALL12 for a 15% discount.)

Kris Collett is the Outreach/Marketing Director for Rethinking Schools.