Call for Science Submissions: Cycle 2

Rethinking Schools needs more articles that focus on science. We are looking for submissions that show what engaging students’ sense of equity and justice looks, sounds, and feels like through the teaching of science.  We seek justice-centered, equity-oriented, story-rich, and critical articles that describe science teaching and curriculum in PK-12 classrooms, community spaces, or PK-12 teacher preparation.

What we need and what to write

Science is more than worksheets, textbooks, and memorization. Science touches everyday lives of all people. We encourage stories from a diverse range of science fields such as natural, physical, earth, and life. We invite you to submit a story that shows science teaching that is sensitive to cultural, historical, environmental, and socioeconomic contexts. We want stories that show how learning science helps students better understand the forces that shape their world. We want educators of all types to share how they use science to enhance learning, promote critique, and address real-world social, cultural, political, and ecological problems—including the climate crisis. We are looking for articles that discuss:

  • teaching science in classrooms from a social justice/equity perspective
  • students and teachers working together to use science as a tool to promote social justice
  • science in everyday practices of various cultures, families, and communities
  • culturally relevant/culturally revitalizing/culturally sustaining science teaching

How to write

Students’ voices are important; make sure we can hear them! Rethinking Schools is purposefully not an academic journal. We want the writing to be lively, conversational, and to avoid needless jargon. Please approach your story as a narrative, filled with anecdotes and voices of students, teachers, parents/guardians, caregivers, family, and/or community members.

****PLEASE NOTE: Before you begin writing or submit your article, please:

  1. Check out the writers’ guidelines;
  2. Read through several issues of Rethinking Schools the magazine noticing how the authors show what they do and how they integrate information about the academic topic into the article; and
  3. Review specific models, such as:

For additional details, review our call for submissions, here.

When and where to send

Cycle II submissions will be accepted until December 2, 2016.

For submissions, go to: http://tiny.cc/RSscience

For inquiries, email: science@rethinkingschools.org 

We look forward to receiving your submission,

Amy Lindahl, Bejanae Kareem, Jana Dean, and Vera Stenhouse

RS Science Submissions Committee

Rhythm and Resistance: Teaching Poetry for Social Justice

RR LC DW intro-hooked (1)

Our new book, Rhythm and Resistance edited by Linda Christensen and Dyan Watson, offers practical lessons about how to teach poetry to build community, understand literature and history, talk back to injustice, and construct stronger literacy skills across content areas and grade levels—from elementary school to graduate school. Rhythm and Resistance reclaims poetry as a necessary part of a larger vision of what it means to teach for justice.

Here is the introduction. Please purchase your copy today on our website.

INTRODUCTION

Most people understand creating a poetry book with the word rhythm in its title, but resistance?
Some folks might think we mean students resisting poetry, but we don’t. Students resist when poetry rustles in dusty tomes, when they are asked to bow before sacred texts, and memorize terms and spit them back on multiple-choice exams. But when students dive headlong into writing poetry, when they share the living, beating heart of their own words, when they hear the pulse of joy and rage from their classmates, they are hooked.

The opening chapters of Rhythm and Resistance demonstrate how poetry can build classroom community and develop students’ confidence in their writing. In order for students to feel like they belong, they have to feel both visible and valued. As Alejandro, one of Linda’s former students wrote, “It wasn’t until we began to write poetry that I started to feel comfortable with writing. Poetry provided me the freedom to start in the middle of my thoughts and finish wherever I wanted. It was circular and allowed me to express myself. After I nervously read a poem in front of the whole school, I finally understood the power and influence of words. The compliments that I received from other students also challenged my definition of what I believed was the only way to get respect.”

For us, the resistance in the title means defiance. We encourage teachers to resist making essays the pinnacle of all writing. Yes, essay writing is important and necessary and can be exciting, but the essay is only one genre of writing. Focusing almost exclusively on essay, as many districts encourage teachers to do, limits student ability to write with passion—and skill—across the genres. Even if the goal is to improve essay writing, we need to teach narrative and poetry. They provide the tools—story, sentence cadence, active verbs—that move students to write passionate persuasive/argumentative essays about issues in the world that trouble them.

We also encourage resistance to the narrowing of curriculum to serve the job market or college; we resist the focus of “drilling down” on facts and on what’s testable. Certainly, students should leave school prepared to enter the real world—the real world where hunger and poverty exist alongside immense profits snuffing out opportunities for family-wage jobs, the real world where wars continue year after year, where governments promise glory to soldiers, but return broken humans. Part of an education for the “real world” must teach empathy, must call attention to policies and actions that harm society’s most vulnerable.

Rhythm and Resistance encourages students to reflect on their own lives as well as the lives of others who people newspapers, literature, and history. We want them to cheer the triumph of Celie at the dinner scene in Alice Walker’s The Color Purple  or to care about Central American children as they brave “The Beast,” or “The Death Train” as it is called by these migrants searching for parents and hope. Through poetry, young people can breathe life into the voices of those who usually don’t find ways into classrooms or textbooks, including their own. This kind of education prepares them to meet the real world with a sense of humanity.

And by resistance, we also mean teaching students to talk back to injustice. When we open our classrooms for students to discuss contemporary issues, we encourage commitment to active engagement as citizens of the world by introducing them to poets like Martín Espada and Patricia Smith, Paul Flores and William Stafford, Katharine Johnson and Renée Watson, Lucille Clifton and Lawson Fusao Inada. We build a culture of conscience by offering students both a context and a vehicle for standing up and talking back when they witness injustice, encouraging them to add their voices to the choir of people who link arms and march in solidarity for a better world. Whether they recite their poetry on a stage framed by dusty blue curtains, as Alejandro did, or a makeshift bandstand at a protest in the park against budget cuts or police brutality, students need opportunities to voice their outrage, to spill their odes and hymns, sonnets and sonatas about the ways society needs to change.

As June Jordan wrote in June Jordan’s Poetry for the People: A Revolutionary Blueprint:

Poetry is a political action undertaken for the sake of information, the faith, the exorcism, and the lyrical invention, that telling the truth makes possible. Poetry means taking control of the language of your life. Good poems can interdict a suicide, rescue a love affair, and build a revolution in which speaking and listening to somebody becomes the first and last purpose to every social encounter. I would hope that folks throughout the U.S.A. would consider the creation of poems as a foundation for true community: a fearless democratic society.

RR LC DW intro-title is invitationOur title is an invitation—asking teachers to join in and resist along with us, to help build this “fearless democratic society” that our students deserve.

Why Poetry? Why Now?
by Linda Christensen

You ask, “Why a book on poetry? Why now?”
Because we stand at the brink of public
education’s demise;
because funds from billionaires
control the mouths of bureaucrats,
who have sold students, teachers,
and their families for a pittance;
because curriculum slanted to serve the “job market”
carves away history and humanity,
poetry and narrative,
student lives and teacher art;
because teaching students to write an essay
without teaching them to write
narratives and poetry is like
teaching someone to swim
using only one arm;
because poets are truth tellers and lie breakers
wordsmiths and visionaries
who sling metaphors in classrooms,
in the narrow slices of school hallways,
on the bricks of public courtyards,
and cafés with blinking neon signs
without laying out a dime to corporations;
because new poets are rising up,
pressing poems against windows on Wall Street,
spilling odes down the spines of textbooks,
posting protest hymns on telephone poles,
bubbling lyrics on the pages of tests
designed to confine their imaginations;
because poems hover under the breath
of the boy in a baseball cap,
the girl with a ring in her nose,
the boy with his mom’s name inked on his neck,
and the silent ones in the back:
she’s the next Lucille Clifton
and he sounds like Roque Dalton, saying:
“poetry, like bread,
is for everyone.”

Here are additional quotes from the book. Please share this great resource with your network! You can find more in our twitter feed.

RR PS second throat

RR RW young people need space

RR AT construct a classroom

RR LC pain power

This Changes Everything Writing Retreat

Rethinking Schools and the Zinn Education Project are partnering with an exciting project: This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate. This “multi-platform” project includes the new book by Naomi Klein (No Logo, The Shock Doctrine), a feature documentary inspired by the book, and an ambitious outreach strategy to share the ideas behind these works with educators and activists, starting in Fall 2014.

Forget everything you think you know about global warming. The really inconvenient truth is that it’s not about carbon—it’s about capitalism. The convenient truth is that we can seize this existential crisis to transform our failed economic system and build something radically better.

 […] We have been told the market will save us, when in fact the addiction to profit and growth is digging us in deeper every day. We have been told it’s impossible to get off fossil fuels when in fact we know exactly how to do it—it just requires breaking every rule in the “free-market” playbook: reining in corporate power, rebuilding local economies, and reclaiming our democracies.

 We have also been told that humanity is too greedy and selfish to rise to this challenge. In fact, all around the world, the fight for the next economy and against reckless extraction is already succeeding in ways both surprising and inspiring.

Jacket copy, This Changes Everything, by Naomi Klein

 

thischangeseverything_collageThe premise of the project is that dealing with the climate crisis requires us to fundamentally rethink how we organize social and economic life. No doubt, this is scary and overwhelming. But this work has a hopeful dimension.

Imagining solutions to the climate crisis involves imagining solutions to a host of other social problems, from economic inequality to public health to job creation to indigenous rights—even to the quality of the food we eat. As the This Changes Everything team writes: “Climate change is more than an issue, it’s a message, one that is telling us that many of our culture’s most cherished ideas about our place in the world—from the quest for endless economic growth to the assumption of Western supremacy to the limitless capacity of humans to dominate nature—are no longer viable.” Rethinking Schools editorializes: “Confronting the climate emergency … demands that young people exercise their utopian imaginations to consider alternatives of all kinds.”

The team behind This Changes Everything understands the central role that education will play in enlisting students in the work of exploring the roots of the climate crisis, considering possible solutions, and coming to see themselves as climate justice activists. That’s where our This Changes Everything Writing Retreat comes in.

We hope to seed articles for Rethinking Schools magazine, and lesson plans that will be posted at the This Changes Everything and Zinn Education Project websites. Participants will come with either classroom-tested lessons relevant for addressing the climate justice themes in Naomi Klein’s forthcoming book This Changes Everything or detailed plans that can form the basis of materials that can be shared at the This Changes Everything and Zinn Education Project websites. We anticipate that this will be a weekend of lively conversation, focused writing, and at least the beginning of imaginative curriculum that will be shared with teachers throughout the English-speaking world.

christensen_bigelow

The K-12 teachers’ writing retreat will be led by Linda Christensen and Bill Bigelow. Christensen has taught for more than 40 years and directs the Oregon Writing Project. She is a Rethinking Schools editor, and is author of Reading, Writing, and Rising Up: Teaching About Social Justice and the Power of the Written Word andTeaching for Joy and Justice. Bill Bigelow taught high school social studies for many years and now is the curriculum editor for Rethinking Schools and co-directs the Zinn Education Project. He is author or co-editor of many books including Rethinking Columbus, Rethinking Globalization, A People’s History for the Classroom, and the forthcoming A People’s Curriculum for the Earth: Teaching About the Environmental Crisis.

Dates and Details:

All lodging and food will be covered. Participants will be responsible for their own transportation to Portland, Oregon, although there will be some limited support for teachers for whom transportation costs would be a burden and make participation unlikely.

Participants must be able to attend the full retreat, which begins on Friday afternoon, Dec. 12 at 2 pm and runs to noon on Dec. 14, 2014.

Sept. 8    Applications are due by 11pm EST
Oct. 15   Notices sent out to applicants about selection decision
Dec. 12-14   Retreat

Application:

Please upload a Word or PDF document with responses to the following questions. The document should be a maximum of three pages with size 12 font, Times New Roman.

  • Personal statement. Briefly, please tell us a little about yourself. Include your teaching background, article and/or curriculum writing experience, and social/environmental justice activism. Feel free to add anything else you’d like to mention.
  • If you have taught about the environment and/or the climate crisis, please describe that work.
  • Why would you like to participate in the Zinn Education Project/This Changes Everything Writing Retreat?
  • Please tell us something about your formal writing experience—e.g., articles you’ve published, lessons or other curriculum you’ve authored, etc.
  • What is your involvement with social justice education activism and organizations—e.g., Rethinking Schools, the Zinn Education Project, Teaching for Change, the Teacher Activist Group network, teacher union activism, etc.?
  • Please include at least one sample of an article or piece of curriculum that you have written.
  • Because we want the Writing Retreat to be racially and ethnically diverse, please indicate how you identify racially and/or ethnically.

Please submit your application as a Word or PDF file through our online form.

Questions can be sent to retreat@zinnedproject.org.

Reposted from: http://zinnedproject.org/2014/08/this-changes-everything-writing-retreat/

Launching a Social Justice Writing Group

by Grace Cornell Gonzales

GraceGonzalezLast year, during a Teachers 4 Social Justice salon in San Francisco, I read Henry Giroux’s “Teachers as Transformative Intellectuals” for the first time. It’s a very academic article but, after pushing through the dense language, I took away a valuable message. As we know, teachers are currently under attack—from media that portray us as inept, union-protected burnouts, from curriculum developers who hope to mechanize and “teacher-proof” our work, from a regime of standardized testing that sets us up for failure and then ranks us. Giroux points out that this vision of teachers is at odds with the fact that teaching is and has always been intellectual work.

When Giroux suggests that we look at ourselves as transformative intellectuals, I take that to mean that teachers need to be the ones doing the speaking and the writing about what teaching means today—telling stories that put students and teachers in the center, that prioritize social justice and create pathways towards a viable and vibrant public education system. For me, writing has been the part of my life that has most made me feel like a transformative intellectual. The biggest gift that Rethinking Schools has given me is a way to conceive of myself as both a teacher and a writer, one who is helping in some small way to construct that counter narrative.

That’s where the idea of running a T4SJ writing study group came from. We began with the idea of encouraging teachers to write about their experiences for publication, adding their voices to the dialogue about what teaching (and particularly social justice teaching) means in our current environment. We wanted to create a writing group where we could workshop our drafts and also look at models of published writing by other educators on social justice themes.

BayAreaWritingGroup

 

My co-facilitator, Mike Tinoco, a high school English teacher and participant in the San José writing project, and I started to design our study group, with a ton of help from the more seasoned core members of T4SJ and from RS managing editor Jody Sokolower. At the annual T4SJ retreat, the organization had envisioned the range of our work as a series of concentric circles—radiating out from the personal at the center, through the realms of classroom, school, and school system, to society as a whole. We took these domains as a structure for picking our readings—we started with readings that focused on the personal, then took a look at classroom articles, finally moving out into articles that address school system and societal issues.

Mike came up with a simple protocol for workshopping our own pieces—sharing highlights, asking clarifying questions, moving on to probing questions, offering concrete suggestions, and finally allowing the writer to reflect on everything they had heard. We asked Jody to come talk about how to “story” writing, and also about the process of submitting to Rethinking Schools.

What blew us away was the amount of interest in the group. Initially worried that not very many people would sign up, we ended up having to create a waiting list. Our final group of 13 includes elementary, middle, and high school teachers; college professors; students; and researchers. It has been an amazing group to work with—diverse, collaborative, critical in their thinking and writing.

We began meeting in November, and will meet once a month through May. At the meetings, we check in, eat dinner, discuss a published article, and then workshop two of our own pieces. By the end of the school year, we hope to have a compilation of our own articles to share on the T4SJ website, and hope that members will submit to Rethinking Schools and similar publications.

So far, we have workshopped articles on:

  • charter schools and how they undermine working conditions for teachers
  • equitable family involvement in bilingual schools
  • curricula around stereotypes in advertising
  • culturally responsive education
  • restorative justice
  • new teachers’ struggles to find authentic ways to interact with students.

I personally can’t wait to see what people bring in for our April and May meetings!

With all the pressures on teachers these days, community is growing more and more important. I count myself so lucky to have a space where I can bring my writing and feel like my voice as a teacher and a writer is affirmed by other wonderfully transformative educator/intellectuals.

We hope to offer this writing group again next year (check out www.t4sj.org for info on future study groups and for current opportunities, such as the salons, to get involved in the Bay Area). If you are interested in our process or protocols, please feel free to contact me at grace@rethinkingschools.org.

And, to read the great Rethinking Schools articles that we’ve discussed in the group this year, check out the links below:

Standing Up for Tocarra, by Tina Owen

Trayvon Martin and My Students, by Linda Christensen

Transsexuals, Teaching Your Children, by Loren Krywanczyk